Word of the Day – 11/11/14


WORD OF THE DAY


SCRUTINY(Noun)
/ˈskruːtɪnɪ/

Meaning:
Critical observation or examination.

Usage:
Every aspect of local government was placed under scrutiny.
In order to deter counterfeiters from passing fake money, cashiers apply scrutiny to the bills they receive.
In order to control the medical negligence issues, the health care process has been brought under scrutiny of the common person as well as the court.

Pronunciationhttp://www.macmillandictionary.com/pronunciation/british/scrutiny


IDIOM/PHRASE OF THE DAY


SLEEP ON IT

Meaning:
To wait before making an important decision.
To postpone a decision on something until the next day, with the implication that a night’s sleep will facilitate judgement.

Usage:
You don’t have to give me your decision now. Sleep on it, and let me know tomorrow.
I don’t know if I want to go on such a long hike; let me sleep on it.

A: Should we go to Paris or London?
B: Let’s sleep on it and make our decision tomorrow.

Word of the Day – 10/11/14


WORD OF THE DAY


PRECEDENT
\ˈpre-sə-dənt\

Meaning:
(Adjective)
Prior in time, order, arrangement, or significance.

(Noun)
A similar action or event that happened at an earlier time.
Something done or said that can be used as an example or rule to be followed in the future.
The usual or traditional way of doing something.

Usage:
The judge’s ruling was based on a precedent established by an earlier decision.
He says that the government will set a dangerous precedent if it refuses to allow the protesters to hold a rally.
The judge’s ruling was based on legal precedent.

Pronunciationhttp://www.macmillandictionary.com/pronunciation/british/precedent


IDIOM/PHRASE OF THE DAY


SIT ON THE FENCE

Meaning:
Not able to or not willing to make a decision.
Not to make a clear choice between two possibilities.

Usage:
When Jane and Tom argue, it is best to sit on the fence and not make either of them angry.
She criticized members of the committee for sitting on the fence and failing to make a useful contribution to the debate.

Word of the Day – 5/11/14


WORD OF THE DAY


PERPLEX(Verb)
/pəˈplɛks/

Meaning:
To confuse or trouble with uncertainty or doubt.
To make confusedly intricate; complicate.

Usage:
Questions about the meaning of life have always perplexed humankind.
Her strange response perplexed me.
Their goal is not to perplex, but to amuse and excite.

Pronunciationhttp://www.macmillandictionary.com/pronunciation/british/perplex


IDIOM/PHRASE OF THE DAY


BE TOO CLEVER BY HALF

Meaning:
To be too confident of your own intelligence in a way that annoys other people.
(Of a person) annoyingly proud of their intelligence or skill, and liable to overreach themselves.

Usage:
At school he had a reputation for arrogance. ‘Too clever by half’ was how one former teacher described him.
She was too clever by half – always correcting the teacher or coming back with a smart answer.

Word Of The Day – 3/11/14


WORD OF THE DAY


INTIMIDATE(Verb)
/ɪnˈtɪmɪdeɪt/

Meaning:
Frighten or overawe (someone), especially in order to make them do what one wants.
To make timid or frightened; scare

Usage:
He tries to intimidate his opponents.
If the purpose of the harsh sentence was to intimidate others, it has not worked well.
For some small business owners, the business startup cost can be so intimidating that they lose their dream before they even get started.

Pronunciation http://www.macmillandictionary.com/pronunciation/british/intimidate


IDIOM/PHRASE OF THE DAY


A DIME A DOZEN

Meaning:
Anything that is common and easy to get.
Abundant; Cheap and common.

Usage:
Romantic movies are a dime a dozen.
People who can write good books are not a dime a dozen.
In this town, fast-food restaurants are a dime a dozen. There is one on every street corner.

Word of the Day – 28/10/14


WORD OF THE DAY


REPUDIATE(Verb)
/rɪˈpjuːdɪeɪt/

Meaning:
To refuse to accept or support (something).
To reject (something or someone).
To say or show that (something) is not true.

Usage:
He has publicly repudiated the government’s policies.
He published an article that repudiates the study’s claims.
The minister repudiated allegations of human rights abuses.
She has repudiated policies associated with previous party leaders.

Pronunciation http://www.macmillandictionary.com/pronunciation/british/repudiate


IDIOM/PHRASE OF THE DAY


TAKE THE EDGE OFF

Meaning:
To reduce the effect of something, usually something unpleasant.

Usage:
Have an apple – it’ll take the edge off your hunger for a while
His apology took the edge off her anger.
Her comments were quite cruel, and nothing could be said to take the edge off of them.
Ceiling fans can take the edge off summer heat.

Word of the Day – 27/10/14


WORD OF THE DAY


RAMPAGE
/ˈram-ˌpāj/

Meaning:
Verb:
Move through a place in a violent and uncontrollable manner.
To rush, move, or act furiously or violently.

Noun:
An occurrence of wild and usually destructive behavior.
A state of violent anger or agitation.

Usage:
The shooting rampage could have ended there if proper security measures were in place.
Some crazy guy went on a rampage in the public library and started grabbing books off the shelves and tossing them around.
There were men dressed in dark armor rampaging around the city with torches and weapons.

Pronunciationhttp://www.macmillandictionary.com/pronunciation/british/rampage


IDIOM/PHRASE OF THE DAY


BELT & BRACES

Meaning:
Using more than one method to make sure that something is safe or sure to happen.
Careful – not taking any chances.

Usage:
Our staff have identity cards and number codes to open doors – that’s part of our belt and braces approach to security.
The envelope was sealed with tape and staples, a real belt and braces job.
He believes in belt and braces, booking flights from two different airports on different airlines for important trips.

Word Of The Day – 22/10/14


WORD OF THE DAY


INTERVENE(Verb)
/ˌin(t)ərˈvēn/

Meaning:
Come between so as to prevent or alter a result or course of events.
Occur in time between events.
To interfere with force or a threat of force.

Usage:
The military had to intervene to restore order.
We will leave on time unless some crisis intervenes.
To occupy the intervening months, she took a job in a hospital.

Pronunciationhttp://www.macmillandictionary.com/pronunciation/british/intervene


IDIOM/PHRASE OF THE DAY


DEEP POCKETS

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Meaning:
If an organization or a person has deep pockets, they have a lot of money.
Substantial financial resources.

Usage:
Anyone who tries to help that company will need deep pockets – it is nearly bankrupt.
I want to start a business in real estate, but first I need to find an investor with deep pockets.
Of course he can afford a yacht, he has deep pockets.

Word Of The Day – 20/10/14


WORD OF THE DAY


NAIVE(Adjective)
/nʌɪˈiːv,nɑːˈiːv/

Meaning:
(of a person or action) showing a lack of experience, wisdom, or judgement.
(of a person) natural and unaffected; innocent.

Usage:
I was young and naive at that time, and I didn’t think anything bad could happen to me.
If you’re naive enough to believe him, you’ll believe anyone.
He has been particularly criticized for lack of military experience and naive views of warfare.
His chronic lack of judgement and naive approach to the complexities of the society lead inevitably to tragedy.

Pronunciation http://www.macmillandictionary.com/pronunciation/british/naive


IDIOM/PHRASE OF THE DAY


CLEAN AS A WHISTLE

Meaning:
If someone is as clean as a whistle, they are not involved in anything illegal.
To be very clean.

Usage:
He hasn’t got a criminal record – he’s clean as a whistle.
The café’s as clean as a whistle, and the food’s excellent.
A political party will make sure a member’s background is as clean as a whistle before letting them run for office.
Everything in a hospital should be as clean as a whistle.

Word Of The Day – 16/10/14


WORD OF THE DAY


FOIBLE(Noun)
\ˈfȯi-bəl\

Meaning:
A minor flaw or shortcoming in character or behavior.
The part of a sword or foil blade between the middle and point.

Usage:
We have to tolerate each other’s little foibles.
We could tolerate my uncle’s foibles because we loved him dearly.
He parries with his foible when a feint is close but his real defense is his feet.
Character faults and foibles surface slowly and are dealt with compassionately.

Pronunciationhttp://www.macmillandictionary.com/pronunciation/british/foible


IDIOM/PHRASE OF THE DAY


GET THE AXE/GIVEN THE AXE

Meaning:
If a person gets the axe, they lose their job.
If a plan or a service gets the axe, it is stopped.

Usage:
The project team was undergoing a major restructuring, recruitment executives were the first to get the axe.
My research project was the first thing to be given the axe when the new boss took over.

Word Of The Day – 15/10/14


WORD OF THE DAY


GREGARIOUS(Adjective)
/ɡrɪˈɡeəriəs/

Meaning:
Enjoying the company of other people; sociable.
(of animals) Living together in herds or flocks.
(of plants) Growing close together but not in dense clusters.

Usage:
He is naturally gregarious, and the work obviously suits him.
A gregarious child ran up to every person on the playground and wanted to be their friend.
Agapanthus is a gregarious flower that likes to be crowded.

Pronunciationhttp://www.macmillandictionary.com/pronunciation/british/gregarious


IDIOM/PHRASE OF THE DAY


CREAM OF THE CROP

Meaning:
The best of a particular group.

Usage:
These three students are very bright. They are the cream of the crop in their class.
This particular car is the cream of the crop.
We’re only interested in the cream of the crop, so don’t send us any second-rate samples.
Only the cream of the crop will be invited to the interviews.